Runoffs on tap for county, state elections

by | Mar 7, 2018 | Latest

After the March 6 primary races concluded, several runoffs developed in county and state races and will be decided in a runoff election set for May 22.

In Justice of the Peace Precinct 2 Republican race, there will be a runoff race between Mike McCandless and incumbent Jerry Shaffer. McCandless received 2,424 votes (37.13 percent) and Shaffer received 2,076 votes (31.80 percent.) Third opponent in the race Jeff Graham received 2,029 votes (31.08 percent.) Whoever wins the runoff will face off against Democratic nomination winner Dian Engelman who received 1,984 votes (100 percent.)

In the U.S. Representative District 3 Democratic race, there will be a runoff also on May 22 between Lorie Burch and Sam Johnson. Burch received 15,468 votes (49.61 percent) and Johnson received 8,943 votes (28.68 percent.) Other candidates in the race received the following votes: Adam P. Bell 5,598 votes (17.95 percent) and Medrick Yhap 1,172 votes (3.76 percent.)

In the U.S. Representative District 32 race, there will be a Democratic runoff between Collin Allred and Brett Shipp. Allred received 585 votes (34.78 percent) and Shipp received 336 votes (19.98 percent.) Other candidates in the race included: Todd Maternowski 28 votes (1.66 percent,) Ron Marshall 88 votes (5.23 percent,) Lillian Salerno 301 votes (17.90 percent,) George Rodriquez 166 votes (9.87 percent) and Ed Meier 178 votes (10.58 percent.)

There will also be a statewide runoff in the Democratic Party for Governor between Lupe Valdez and Andrew White. Throughout the state Valdez received 436,295 votes (42.89 percent) and White received 278,588 votes (27.38 percent.) Other candidates included: James Jolly Clark 21,925 votes (2.15 percent,) Cedrick Davis, Sr. 83,873 votes (8.24 percent,) Joe Mumback 13,905 votes (1.36 percent,) Adrian Oceguenda 44,793 (4.40 percent,) Jeffrey Payne 48,348 votes (4.75 percent,) Tom Wakely 34,847 votes (3.42 percent,) and Grady Yarbrough 54,576 votes (5.36 percent.)

In the Republican Primary races, incumbent Ted Cruz won the nomination for U.S. Senator. He received 54,531 votes (82.83 percent.) He will race off against Democrat Beto O’Rourke in the November race. O’Rourke received 22,622 votes (65.48 percent.)

For U.S. Representative District 3, which was R-Sam Johnson’s seat, Van Taylor won the nomination for the Republican Party. He received 45,475 votes (84.66 percent.) He will face the winner of the Democratic runoff race between Burch and Johnson.

In the U.S. Representative District 4 race, the Republican nomination was won by John Ratcliffe with 2,897 votes (80.85 percent.) He will race off against Democrat Catherine Krantz who received 629 votes (77.56 percent) in the Democratic primary.

Incumbent Pete Sessions received the Republican nomination for U.S. Representative District 32 with 2,418 votes (76.79 percent.) He will face off against the winner of the Democratic runoff between Allred and Shipp.

In the Governor’s race, incumbent Greg Abbott received the nomination for the Republican party. Statewide, he received 1.39 million votes (90.39 percent.) In Collin County, Abbott received 59,565 votes (90.94 percent.) He will face off against the winner of the Democratic runoff race for governor between Valdez and White.

For Lt. Governor, incumbent Dan Patrick received the nomination for the Republican party. Statewide, he received 1.16 million votes (75.91 percent.) He will face off against the winner of the Democratic nomination for Lt. Governor Mike Collier who received 17,912 votes (57.41 percent) in Collin County. Statewide, he received 501,395 votes (52.37 percent.)

In the State Senate race for District 30, the Republican nomination was won by Pat Fallon. He received 6,223 votes or (60.08 percent.) Other Republican nominees included incumbent Craig Estes who received 2,585 votes (24.96 percent) and Craig Carter who received 1,550 votes (14.96 votes.) Fallon will race off in November against Democratic nominee Kevin Lopez who received 2,700 votes (100 percent.)

Race for State Representative for District 33 will be between incumbent R-Justin Holland who received 5,529 votes (100 percent) and D-Laura Gunn who received 2,773 votes (100 percent.)

For the State Representative District 89 seat, formerly held by Republican Jodie Laubenberg, Candy Noble received the Republican nomination with 7,897 votes (54.18 percent.) Republican nominee John Payton received 6,679 votes (45.82 percent.) Noble will face off against Democrat Ray Ash who received 5,332 votes (100 percent.)

The Criminal District Attorney Republican nomination was received by incumbent Greg Willis with 38,686 votes (78.64 percent.) Republican nominee Casey Davis received 10,510 votes (21.36 percent.)

In the County Judge race, former County Commissioner Chris Hill received the Republican nomination with 31,871 votes (60.84 percent.) Other Republican candidates included Scott Johnson who received 16,388 votes (31.28 percent) and Ray Ricchi who received 4,125 votes (7.87 percent.) Hill will face off against Democratic primary winner Danyell Lanier who received 26,016 votes (100 percent) in November.

For County Commissioner Precinct 2, incumbent Cheryl Williams received the Republican nomination with 8,295 votes (68.60 percent.) Other Republican nominee Joey Herald received 3,796 votes (31.40 percent.) Williams will face off against Democratic primary winner Tanner Do who received 6,276 votes (100 percent) in November.

For County Commissioner Precinct 3, Darrell Hale received the Republican nomination with 8,542 votes (56.03 percent.) Other Republican nominee Briana Andor received 6,704 votes (43.97 percent.) Hale will face off against Democratic primary winner David Azad who received 5,773 votes (100 percent.)

Statewide, there were several nonbinding propositions on both the Republican and Democratic Primary ballots to poll voters about issues to see what issues legislation needed to discuss next session. All propositions on both sides received positive approval.

Republican Party ballots contained 11 propositions and Democratic Ballots had 12.

The two parties took different approaches to their polling—Republicans ask for direction on specific legislation and Democrats take a broader approach on general social issues.

For example, the first proposition on GOP ballots asked voters if “Texas should replace the property tax system with an appropriate consumption tax equivalent,” whereas Democratic voters were asked in their first proposition if everyone in Texas should have the right to a quality public education from pre-k through 12th grade, and affordable college and career training without the burden of crushing student loan debt.

A big difference in the ballots was that the Democrats frame their polling as “rights.”

The two parties took different tacks on education. In addition to asking about the right to quality public education, they proposed refinancing of student loan debt at zero percent.

Republicans, on the other hand, asked for opinions on granting tax credits for students to attend private schools.

In spite of losing the battle twice last year, in the regular session and a special session of the Texas Legislature, a GOP proposition resurrected the “bathroom bill” by asking if the state should protect the privacy and safety of women and children in bathrooms, locker rooms and showers in all Texas schools and public buildings.

The two parties also took different approaches on voting, with Republicans asking to make voter fraud a felony charge and Democrats seeking to make voting easier and limiting corporate campaign influence, foreign interference and gerrymandering.

On taxes, the Democrats asked for an opinion for the right to a “fair tax system, where all interests (business, corporations and individuals) pay their fair share.”

Republicans, in addition to suggesting that property taxes be replaced with a consumption tax, were more specific. They proposed capping property tax revenue growth at four percent per year, with increases over that amount requiring voter approval. Also, the GOP asked if tax dollars should be used to fund construction of stadiums for professional and semi-professional sports teams.

Democrats sought direction on the proposed right to paid family and sick leave, and a living wage, as well as creating a national jobs program to replace crumbling infrastructure and rebuild hurricane damaged areas, financed through local, state and federal low-interest bonds.

The Republican jobs proposition was to “require employers to screen new hires through the free E-Verify system to protect jobs for legal workers.”

Other propositions on the GOP ballot included a ban on construction of toll roads unless approved by voters, changing the way the Texas Speaker of the House is elected, abolishing abortion in the state and demanding that the U.S. Congress repeal Obamacare.

Rounding out propositions on Democratic Primary ballots were “rights” to a healthy environment, freedom from discrimination and harassment, affordable and accessible housing with modern utilities, a fair criminal justice system and comprehensive immigration reform that includes a path to citizenship.

By Wyndi Veigel and Joe Reavis • Staff Writers • [email protected]

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