Now is time for a resurrection of faith

by | Apr 8, 2020 | Opinion

For Christian Americans celebrating the Resurrection of Jesus Christ Sunday, April 12, the timing could not be more appropriate.

Citizens have been forewarned that the apex of this COVID-19 pandemic is about to hit the U.S. For some, that strikes a chord of fear, but we must remember the bigger picture. For us, God sacrificed his only son for our sins and his resurrection three days later turned doubters into believers.

Local pastors report now more than ever people are logging online to watch church. Let’s hope this year’s Easter celebrations welcome millions of people searching, and finding, God during this period of uncertainty.

But what happens post pandemic?

After Easter has come and gone, and COVID-19 is in the rearview mirror, hopefully time spent during Stay-at-Home orders taught us to appreciate how our lives benefit from not only Christ’s resurrection but perhaps a resurrection is needed in other areas of our lives.

As many families were at their breaking point, time stopped, and family life was resurrected. Schedules unraveled, business trips were cancelled, and work for some suddenly became less complicated. Parents and children reconnected, not always joyously, but unity was forged as we learned and played together.

Somewhere along the way, compassion for others kicked in and long-lost friendships were resurrected as we reached out to others lost to time, distance, and the busyness of life. We called old friends, reached out to elderly neighbors and found ways to be of service to others.

Appreciation for caregivers and medical personnel has had a resurgence. While we’ve always needed them to diagnose, heal and take care of our loved ones, sometimes it takes a pandemic to realize we are lucky to have the standard of care we do in the U.S.

Growing up in a world without polio, smallpox, measles and other diseases that have been eradicated, some view vaccinations as optional. Let’s resurrect the belief in our scientists and the work they do as we anxiously await a vaccine that will prevent this virus in the future.

A sustainable lifestyle for Americans is not just something for the Birkenstock-wearing population. It was the way of life for many of our ancestors. However, in the last few decades, grocery stores have become the primary food source for many of us. COVID-19 has caused Americans to panic buy, and suddenly we understand the term ‘supply chain.’ Our unpopular neighbors with chickens now have the eggs we need. Let’s hope for a resurrection of home and community gardens and appreciation for local farmers. A little control over our food supply will go a long way.

While budgets make sense, they are underutilized and should be resurrected. This is where we learn to live within our means on what we make, not what we can borrow. According to statistics, over 80 percent of Americans are in debt, 29 percent have more credit card debt than savings, and 44.7 million Americans have student loan debt. That’s not financially healthy.

The pandemic has brought a newfound appreciation of local businesses, though mostly restaurants. Local business owners of all types – even us newspapers – will struggle to fight our way back after having served the community for years.

While we cannot change the virus, nor the collateral damage it has and will cause, we can resurrect our faith and a plan for the future.

For more stories like this, see the April 9 issue or subscribe online.

By Sonia Duggan • Associate Publisher for C&S Media

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